Trauma Informed Criminal Justice-Part 2

How prevalent is a history of trauma among people who are incarcerated or otherwise in the criminal justice system? According to SAMHSA’s GAINS Center, here are some statistics:

  • the MacArthur Mental Health Court (MHC) study documented trauma histories of 311 mental health court participants in three states and found that:

- 70% of women and 25% of men were sexually abused or raped before age 20

- 67% of women and 73% of men experienced child physical abuse (any kind other than sexual abuse)

- 61% of women and 68% of men had experienced their parents beating or hitting them with a belt, whip or strap

- 46% of women and 27% of men had witnessed their parents hitting or throwing things at each other

- 39% of women and 28% of men had experienced having the father-figure in their childhood home being arrested

- 25% of women and 20% of men had experienced the father-figure in their childhood home using drugs

SAMHSA’s GAINS Center also reports findings from the Targeted Capacity Expansion (TCE) for Jail Diversion Study, a 5-year study of men and women with co-occuring mental health and substance use disorders who were in jail diversion programs. This study was funded by SAMHSA from 2002 – 2007. The TCE researchers found that:

  • 96% of the women and 89% of the men in jail diversion programs reported lifetime trauma
  • 74% of the women and 86% of the men in jail diversion programs reported current trauma

SAMHSA draws the following conclusions from the research on trauma among justice-involved individuals:

“There are high levels of trauma in both men and women, and in justice-involved individuals. Based on these statistics, it is safe to assume that everyone who comes into contact with the justice system has a history of trauma, so criminal justice professionals should take ‘universal precautions’.”

Posted by Melanie Tagged as: rmo resilience aces trauma-informed care trauma

Next: Trauma-Informed Criminal Justice: Reflections on first round of training

Previous: How being trauma-informed improves criminal justice responses

Comments