Title: Childhood Appendicitis – What Every Parent Needs to Know

Word Count: about 700 words

Abstract:

“Abdominal pain is one of the few real pediatric emergencies,” says Dr. Alvin Eden, clinical professor of pediatrics at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. Yet “tummy-aches” are so common in children. How can parents tell when it may be appendicitis? This covers symptoms, what to do and what not to do, diagnosis, treatment and risk factors for appendicitis in children.

Excerpt:

“Mommy, my belly hurts,” your child says. Such complaints are fairly common among children. So how do you know when it may be something more serious like appendicitis?

“Abdominal pain is one of the few real pediatric emergencies,” says Dr. Alvin Eden, clinical professor of pediatrics at Weill Medical College of Cornell University. “Parents need to take abdominal pain seriously, especially if it doesn’t go away and if vomiting is involved.” The location of the abdominal pain is key, says Eden. Appendicitis starts with pain near the belly button. The pain may then move down and to the right. While abdominal pain associated with stomach flu or gastroenteritis comes and goes, appendicitis pain tends to be continual and gets steadily worse.

Other symptoms of appendicitis may include . . .

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